SKIL was created by; is driven by; and is focused on persons with disabilities, their families, and communities. We provide Advocacy, Education, and Support with Customer Controlled services to break down and remove existing barriers and bridge social gaps to ensure and preserve Equality and Independence for all.

If you are not working or working reduced hours due to COVID-19, you may be eligible for Unemployment Insurance (UI) benefits.
If you suspect an unemployment claim has been improperly filed using your identity, click here.

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Due to the potential spread of the Corona Virus, all SKIL Offices will be closed to visitors and the general public until further notice.


SKIL staff will continue providing services while the offices are closed. Communication, during this time, will take place through phone, email or fax. If needing to turn in or receive a hire packet and/or other paperwork, we encourage you to send your information by email to your local SKIL office. When bringing paperwork to SKIL offices during regular business hours, call that office, and someone will come to the door to assist you.DSW Essential Worker - Proof Form
 

  IMPORTANT NOTICE!

ALL Exception forms are due by the 5th & the 20th of the Month.
Exception forms received late will be paid on the Late Batch, which is called in ON paydays.

Any time sheet received past 10:00 am on Paydays WILL pay the FOLLOWING pay date.

This change is in accordance with The Federal Reserve requirements of our Financial Institution.
Please be sure to use the Authenticare Call system for prompt payment.


 

 

 

OVERLAND PARK ICE CREAM SHOP TO EMPLOY DISABLED WORKERS

golden_scoop_web.jpg - A new ice cream and coffee shop with a mission of hiring disabled workers is set to open in Overland Park in early 2021. The shop, The Golden Scoop (at 9450 Nall Street), was the dream of owner Lindsay Krumholtz.  For the past seventeen years, Krumbholz has worked with individuals with disabilities. She started in the Olathe school district in 2003. “I had just graduated from Pittsburg State,” Krumholtz explains, “and they said you're going to work with an individual who has autism.”  Krumbholz says she wasn't familiar with autism at the time, but that didn't hinder her. “From the moment I started, I connected with this kid,” she says. Feeling pressure from her father who urged her to go into sales, she left the school district briefly in 2005. She then went to work in sales at a Kansas City radio station, where she worked for a mere two weeks before realizing she had made a mistake. “I realized this was not my jam,” she says. “Working with individuals with disabilities was definitely my passion.”  She then returned to the Olathe school district, hoping to get her old job back. They hired her back, but she got a different job. “They actually gave me a better opportunity, traveling from school to school throughout the day and working with a variety of individuals,” Krumbholz says. “I did that for another two years.” Yearning to learn more, she applied for the job at the Kansas City Autism Center, where she learned Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA). She then worked at an in-home business providing ABA to individuals with disabilities.  “Listening to parents, their biggest concern was, 'Will they ever have a job?' 'Will they live on their own?' 'What does their future look like?'” Krumbholz explains. She then read about a business in Wilmington, North Carolina called Beau's Coffee that employed disabled workers.  “I approached my sister who has a business background and I said, 'Kansas City needs something like this,'” Krumbholz says. Together they worked on a business plan. Krumbholz then heard about an ice cream shop called Howdy Ice Cream in Dallas, Texas employing disabled workers. This led to another epiphany, which was to combine both coffee and ice cream because, as Krumbholz says, “Who doesn't love coffee and ice cream, right?” She credits her sister as the business mastermind behind all this. “This is happening because of her,” she says. “I'm very thankful for her.”  In addition to employing disabled people as the business' “Super Scoopers”, it will also feature a stage area where they can sing and perform, showcasing their many talents.  The idea has been met with great enthusiasm by Overland Park and Kansas City residents. “The community response has been amazing,” Krumbholz says. “2020 has been kind of a down year for a lot of people, and I think a lot of people in the Kansas City are are just wanting some positive news. So we're happy that we can provide this to that community.”  Despite the community enthusiasm, Krumbholz says The Golden Scoop still needs additional funding to build out and for equipment costs, and “most importantly to pay our Super Scoopers from day one.” Because of this, The Golden Scoop has set up a GoFundMe page to help raise funding.  The Golden Scoop GoFundMe page can be found at: https://charity.gofundme.com/o/en/campaign/the-golden-scoop-needs-youby Andy Rausch and Joe Reinecker - A new ice cream and coffee shop with a mission of hiring disabled workers is set to open in Overland Park in early 2021. The shop, The Golden Scoop (at 9450 Nall Street), was the dream of owner Lindsay Krumholtz.

For the past seventeen years, Krumbholz has worked with individuals with disabilities. She started in the Olathe school district in 2003. “I had just graduated from Pittsburg State,” Krumholtz explains, “and they said you're going to work with an individual who has autism.”

Krumbholz says she wasn't familiar with autism at the time, but that didn't hinder her. “From the moment I started, I connected with this kid,” she says. Feeling pressure from her father who urged her to go into sales, she left the school district briefly in 2005. She then went to work in sales at a Kansas City radio station, where she worked for a mere two weeks before realizing she had made a mistake. “I realized this was not my jam,” she says. “Working with individuals with disabilities was definitely my passion.”

She then returned to the Olathe school district, hoping to get her old job back. They hired her back, but she got a different job. “They actually gave me a better opportunity, traveling from school to school throughout the day and working with a variety of individuals,” Krumbholz says. “I did that for another two years.” Yearning to learn more, she applied for the job at the Kansas City Autism Center, where she learned Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA). She then worked at an in-home business providing ABA to individuals with disabilities.

“Listening to parents, their biggest concern was, 'Will they ever have a job?' 'Will they live on their own?' 'What does their future look like?'” Krumbholz explains. She then read about a business in Wilmington, North Carolina called Beau's Coffee that employed disabled workers.

“I approached my sister who has a business background and I said, 'Kansas City needs something like this,'” Krumbholz says. Together they worked on a business plan. Krumbholz then heard about an ice cream shop called Howdy Ice Cream in Dallas, Texas employing disabled workers. This led to another epiphany, which was to combine both coffee and ice cream because, as Krumbholz says, “Who doesn't love coffee and ice cream, right?” She credits her sister as the business mastermind behind all this. “This is happening because of her,” she says. “I'm very thankful for her.”

In addition to employing disabled people as the business' “Super Scoopers”, it will also feature a stage area where they can sing and perform, showcasing their many talents.

The idea has been met with great enthusiasm by Overland Park and Kansas City residents. “The community response has been amazing,” Krumbholz says. “2020 has been kind of a down year for a lot of people, and I think a lot of people in the Kansas City are are just wanting some positive news. So we're happy that we can provide this to that community.”

Despite the community enthusiasm, Krumbholz says The Golden Scoop still needs additional funding to build out and for equipment costs, and “most importantly to pay our Super Scoopers from day one.” Because of this, The Golden Scoop has set up a GoFundMe page to help raise funding.

The Golden Scoop GoFundMe page can be found at: https://charity.gofundme.com/o/en/campaign/the-golden-scoop-needs-you