SKIL was created by; is driven by; and is focused on persons with disabilities, their families, and communities. We provide Advocacy, Education,and Support with Customer Controlled services to break down and remove existing barriers and bridge social gaps to ensure and preserve Equality and Independence for all.


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Skip Smith photos of 2012 FHNB

 A Winner at Fishing Has No Boundaries had its ninth annual event at Big Hill Lake for persons of all ages with disabilities. Everyone enjoyed a day of fishing, food, and fun. The event will began at about 8:00 am Saturday morning June 9, 2012. Click here to send a comment: Fishing Has No Boundaries had its ninth annual event at Big Hill Lake for persons of all ages with disabilities. Everyone enjoyed a day of fishing, food, and fun. The event will began at about 8:00 am Saturday morning June 9, 2012.

A quick breakfast and the fishing began will a surge in the activity. From a 19.5 inch channel catfish down to any size that could be measured was tallied as contestant competed for the many prizes from sponsors and supporters of the event.

The Cherryvale overlook number one was set up as base camp, and lunch was ready when everyone came in form the lake and the boats.

Anglers from all ages and abilities were able to attend and participate in the event. Through adaptive angling equipment such as pole holders, different kinds of electric reels, joy stick or chin operating, ramp systems to gain access to boats, wider pontoon boat doorways, reel grippers, and many other assistance angling tools two very different worlds has been brought together to learn as a unified team from each other by sharing the same passion and dreams.

A FHNB Inc. event is truly an unforgettable way to spend a day on or near the lakeshore with a new friend, relative, neighbor, co-worker, or a much anticipated comrade in the thrill of catching that "big one" no matter the size. If you are interested in participating or volunteering to help with the next event, please contact SEK FHNB P.O. Box 957 Parsons, KS. 67357. Or call (800) 688-5616. Many more photos at the read more link.

Read more: Skip Smith photos of 2012 FHNB

Legislature ends Day 95 without budget accord

Some progress made but final deal high-centered over tax differences

By Mike Shields
KHI News Service
Originally published May 16, 2012 at 6:41 p.m., updated May 17, 2012 at 6:46 a.m.

Among the things tentatively agreed to on Wednesday:

The House agreed to drop its budget proviso that would have barred the Kansas Insurance Department from spending federal grant dollars associated with the Affordable Care Act, which Kansas, along with 25 other states, is challenging in the U.S. Supreme Court. The department had about $800,000 of a $1.9 million grant remaining as of April 18, according to legislative staffers.

Negotiators agreed to spend $3.6 million in the coming fiscal year to help reduce waiting lists for home and community based Medicaid services for the disabled; $1.8 million would be earmarked for the physically disabled and $1.8 million would be for the developmentally disabled.

They also agreed on provisions that would delay the inclusion of long-term services for the developmentally disabled in KanCare, the governor's plan for remaking the state Medicaid program. The bill would postpone the inclusion until one year after the launch of KanCare regardless when the program starts. But it also would allow for sooner changes in the ways the need for services are assessed. Those changes could begin with introduction of the KanCare program, which still needs federal approvals to be launched. The administration aims to begin KanCare on Jan. 1, 2013.

The budget teams agreed to meet again at 9:30 a.m. on Thursday. The tax teams had not yet scheduled their next meeting when both chambers adjourned for the day.

KanCare Concerns form SILCK and KACIL

Statewide Independent Living Council of Kansas (SILCK) and Kansas Association of Centers for Independent Living (KACIL)

Access to Home and Community Based Services Waivers by all people eligible. Addressing the long waiting lists for Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) should be a priority before any systems change occurs. Florida implemented their expanded Managed Care programs without addressing the waiting lists. At that time, advocates warned costs for very expensive nursing facility placements would increase by denying access to home care services. A new study shows these fears have been realized. The waiting lists have grown 30% over the last year and the for-profit Managed Care plan was not able to contain costs. In fact, that plan cost the state of Florida significantly more, 34%-54% more, than the traditional non-profit plans.1

Read more: KanCare Concerns form SILCK and KACIL

Kansas City Star - Kansas ignores the needs of the physically disabled

Read more here: http://www.kansascity.com/2012/04/21/3567357/the-stars-editorial-ignoring-the.html#storylink=cpy

Kansas is allowing the plight of its disabled citizens to fester like a neglected bedsore. Whereas four years ago all physically disabled Kansans who met income guidelines received services to help them remain in their homes and recover from strokes and other debilitating conditions, more than 3,500 people are now on a waiting list.Kansas is allowing the plight of its disabled citizens to fester like a neglected bedsore. Whereas four years ago all physically disabled Kansans who met income guidelines received services to help them remain in their homes and recover from strokes and other debilitating conditions, more than 3,500 people are now on a waiting list.

The number of developmentally disabled Kansans waiting for service such as in-home care and vocational opportunities is around 4,000. If there is a plan for whittling down the lists, no one seems to know what it is.
“We deplore the waiting lists, but it’s a matter of money,” said Angela de Rocha, spokeswoman for the Kansas Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services.

But budget analysts are projecting a $700,000,000 revenue surplus for Kansas government this year, and there has been no sign that the administration intends to spend any of it to provide even slight relief for disabled citizens. Kansas’ treatment of people who suffer from permanent developmental disabilities has been a long-running disgrace. Year after year, governors and legislators have opted to spend money elsewhere, or give it away in the form of tax breaks, while families wait for services to give children and adults a better quality of life.

Read more: Kansas City Star - Kansas ignores the needs of the physically disabled